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Andy Warhol

(1928-1987

Color screenprint on Arches wove paper, Luciano Anselmino, Milan, Italy, pub., Alexander Heinrici, New York, prntr.

Andy Warhol (1928-1987, American) "Ladies and gentleman" (one print from the set of ten), 1975 Color screenprint on Arches wove paper, Luciano Anselmino, Milan, Italy, pub., Alexander Heinrici, New York, prntr. Edition 50/125 (there were also 25 artist's proofs), signed, dated and numbered verso: Andy Warhol / 75 Sheet: 43.25" H x 28.5" W; Image: 32.25" H x 23" W Literature: Ed. Feldman and Shellmann, "Andy Warhol Prints Catalogue Raisonné, 1962-1987," New York, 1997, p. 128, no. 129 Notes: Ever the art world provocateur, Warhol was fascinated by the ripe possibilities of applying modern mechanization techniques to his artistic practice. Much of Warhol's celebrated oeuvre takes the form of silkscreen prints that call attention to themes related to modern-day capitalistic practices and society's insatiable preoccupation with fame. By 1975, Warhol had shifted attention from his earlier iconic color-block celebrity portraits, choosing to instead delve into New York's then-marginalized cross-dressing community. This distinct portrait series, "Ladies and Gentleman," is derived from Warhol's Polaroid photographs taken at the Gilded Grape nightclub. Warhol then transferred the images to silkscreen, declaring their colorful personalities and penchant for cosmetics through a superimposed patchwork of color. Warhol imbues these subjects with the same heroic quality befitting his famous faces, a celebration of the panache and glamour associated with the provocative cross-dressing culture.